Comics Ate My Brain

July 15, 2008

New comics 7/10/08

Filed under: batman, booster gold, defenders, green arrow, superman, trinity, weekly roundups, wonder woman — Tom Bondurant @ 2:20 pm
I read a good bit of Marvel in the ’70s, but I never got into the Marvel Universe the way I did the DC Multiverse. I think that’s part of the reason I have such affection for The Defenders. Both book and concept are hard to define, and deliberately so. Therefore, their possibilities are wide open, and they can provide a consistent, perpetual “outsider” perspective because their status quo is constantly changing.

All of that means I’m not quite sure what to make of the latest issue of The Last Defenders (#5 written by Joe Casey, pencilled by Jim Muniz, inked by Cam Smith). On one hand it’s clever that our protagonist, Nighthawk, is constantly being foiled in his attempts to re-form the Defenders. They’re a non-team, with little “form” anyway. On the other hand, though, the miniseries implies rather strongly that there is a “Platonic ideal” of the Defenders … which would, paradoxically, defeat the entire purpose of having a non-team. So I’m curious to see how Casey resolves that little conundrum.

I’m still not sold on Jim Muniz and Cam Smith’s art. This is a black comedy, and the thick, blocky Ed McGuinness style doesn’t quite work. Maybe Kevin Maguire would have been too much to ask for, but he or someone like him could have conveyed both Nighthawk’s schlubbiness and the big-super-action aspects of this story. Even so, I’m enjoying the miniseries, and like I said, curious to see how it works out.

Wonder Woman #22 (written by Gail Simone, pencilled by Aaron Lopresti, inked by Matt Ryan) is likewise an arc’s penultimate issue, wherein Diana struggles mightily with the dark forces roiling inside her. Pretty good struggle, too, although I got a little lost in all the reversals and betrayals. Lopresti and Ryan continue to turn in good work. It’s not over-rendered, and it’s well within the Adam Hughes/Terry Dodson-esque style the book favors. However, it’s intricate enough in spots to evoke a more … ornamented? … feel, and that reinforces the “medieval” barbarian feel which has characterized Diana’s quest. Oh, and there’s another wacky misunderstanding involving Nemesis and Diana’s ape-warrior houseguests. It goes on a bit too long, but ends in a way which I hope forestalls future shenanigans.

Perhaps the most pleasant surprise of Action Comics #867 (-5309 … sorry … written by Geoff Johns, pencilled by Gary Frank, inked by Jon Sibal) is its portrayal of Supergirl. She only shows up for a few pages at the beginning, but she comes across very well. She’s not a fantasy-teen with an impossibly thin frame; and neither is she mopey and consumed with questions of her place in the world. Instead, she’s very believable both as Superman’s protege and as someone with personal experiences of her doomed home planet. Much of this comes from Frank and Sibal, who give Kara the body language and expressions first of boredom, and then of creeping dread. For Supergirl, Brainiac is literally the bogeyman, and she’s not too far removed from being a frightened child. Here’s hoping we see more of this Supergirl in the future.

And yeah, Superman fights Brainiac too, in all its Terminator+Borg implacability. It’s a virtually dialogue-free sequence lasting eight pages, and it wisely relies upon the art (no narrative captions, either). I used to be very hard on Geoff Johns, but he’s really starting to find a good groove here. I wouldn’t be surprised if he’s growing more fond of his Action work than he is of Green Lantern, which by now must be very familiar to him.

Speaking of being particularly hard on something, Paul Dini will have to work overtime to convince me that Hush is a credible Bat-villain. His first effort, Detective Comics #846 (pencilled by Dustin Nguyen, inked by Derek Fridolfs) still falls short, although it’s due more to Hush than to Dini. See, Tommy “Hush” Elliott was set up as an evil counterpart to Bruce Wayne: a bratty rich kid who tried to kill both parents but who blames Dr. Thomas Wayne (and, by extension, Bruce) for saving his mom’s life. So — stick with me here — Tommy grows up to be a world-famous surgeon, engineers attacks on Bruce Wayne and Batman through Batman’s greatest foes, and for some reason dresses in a trenchcoat, body-suit (with “H” symbol on the left breast), and hey-I’m-disfigured bandages around his head. Maybe he is disfigured now; I dunno. Anyway, Hush struck me as a collection of so-so ideas wrapped into a poor excuse for a supervillain. Consequently, I don’t relish the idea of a five-part story focused on him.

However, “Heart of Hush” Part 1 does bring Catwoman back into the main line Bat-books, and Dini, Nguyen, and Fridolfs produce a neat story about Catwoman and Batman trying to bring down a much better idea for a wannabe supervillain, Doctor Aesop. That part of the issue was fun. Who knows, maybe the Hush parts will end up being worthwhile too.

Catwoman is, of course, a big part of Batman Confidential #19 (written by Fabian Nicieza, drawn by Kevin Maguire). This is the first part of the storyline which doesn’t dwell on how she and Batgirl are Teh Sexxxay, and I think it allows everyone to settle down and concentrate on the characters themselves. I thought writer and artist had almost been working independently of one another the first couple of issues, so this was a good installment which advanced the plot well and also gave our heroines some good interaction.

I liked Booster Gold #1,000,000 (written by Geoff Johns and Jeff Katz, pencilled by Dan Jurgens, inked by Norm Rapmund) a lot. More about Booster’s relationship with Rip than the cover-featured Peter Platinum, it serves as a nice wrap-up to Johns’ time on the title. Booster gets closure on what he considers his failures, and an old cast member from the original BG series rejoins. Chuck Dixon comes aboard for two issues before the new writer debuts, and whoever that is will have a lot to live up to.

Green Arrow And Black Canary #10 (written by Judd Winick, pencilled by Mike Norton, inked by Wayne Faucher) is a Big Fight involving the League of Assassins’ super-powered flunkies, Team Arrow, and Batman and Plastic Man. As these things go, it’s choreographed well, although I’m not sure how close Dodger (a/k/a Smarmy British Rogue) is coming to Mary-Sue status. At one point, Speedy observes she’s got “half the Justice League” on her side, which is a pretty accurate assessment; but the villains are credible enough that they don’t go down too quickly.

Finally, of course I bought Trinity #6, but I spend enough time talking about that as it is. So far it’s been reliably entertaining, and if it does something especially good or horribly bad, I’ll let you know.

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1 Comment »

  1. Hey, I always liked the Defenders. The book seemed to be devoted to all those heroes that didn’t seem to fit in any other title — which is ultimately what made the team so darned interesting. 🙂

    Comment by Sea_of_Green — July 15, 2008 @ 5:35 pm


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